Showing 145–160 of 205 results

African Red Eye Tetra (Arnoldichthys spilopterus)

$17.49

A larger growing and colorful tetra found in lakes and rivers throughout Nigeria, the African Red Eye or Big Scaled Tetra is a robust and hardy schooling fish. Best kept in groups of at least 5, they will also do well with other larger tankmates. In the aquarium, they are hardy and undemanding. The addition of tannins in the form of Indian Almond Leaves or other botanicals will help bring out their best coloration.

Gold Spot Bristlenose Pleco (Ancistrus triradiatus)

$8.99$14.99

One of the first of the bristlenose pleco species to become popular in the aquarium hobby, the Gold Spot or Three Ray Bristlenose is found in rocky, clear water streams along the upper Rio Meta in Colombia and Venezuela. Like most bristlenose plecos in the genus Ancistrus, they are hardy and adaptable in the aquarium in addition to being excellent nuisance algae eaters. Adult males develop extensive ‘tentacles’ around the snout which gives this complex its common name. The species is easy to breed in the aquarium when provided with good quality food and maintained in good water quality.

Eques Pencilfish (Nannostomus eques) – Group of 5 Fish

$14.99

The Eques or Diptail Pencilfish is a widely distributed loosely schooling fish found throughout much of the Amazon and Orinoco Basins.With their distinctive ‘head up’ posture (which helps them remain invisible to predators in the wild) and peaceful demeanor they have been a popular fish in the freshwater hobby for decades. Typically found in warm, extremely shallow waters alongside other tetra species, they prefer soft, acidic water conditions but are adaptable in the aquarium. Best kept in groups of 5 or more, they are relatively easy to care for but care should be taken to ensure larger or faster moving tankmates don’t outcompete them for food.

Red Beckford’s Pencilfish (Nannostomus beckfordi ‘red’) – Group of 5 Fish

$14.99

The Red form of the popular Beckford’s or Golden Pencilfish is a selectively bred strain which has been developed by breeders over generations to give the fish a vibrant red coloration. One of the hardiest pencilfish, they are well-suited for a peaceful community aquarium and are popular with aquascapers and planted tank hobbyists due to their color and interesting behavior. With their small adult size, they also make a great fish for nano aquariums as well. In the aquarium, they are relatively easy to care for, but care should be taken to ensure larger or faster moving tankmates don’t outcompete them for food.

Ruby Tetra (Axelrodia riesei) – Group of 5 Fish

$14.99

A stunning dwarf tetra found in Colombia's Rio Meta drainage, the Ruby Tetra lives up to its name, exhibiting a deep red coloration throughout its entire body. With an adult size of only 1″, they are an ideal nano aquarium fish and are deservedly popular with planted aquarium hobbyists as well. Best kept in schools of 5 or more, the Ruby Tetra is an active and hardy fish which will display their best color in a large group an when kept in ideal water conditions.

Amazon Otocinclus (Otocinclus cf. macrospilus) – Group of 5

$14.99

One of the most popular aquarium algae eaters (and for good reason), the Oto Cat or Otocinclus is a small, schooling suckermouth catfish found throughout much of South America. There are several species commonly imported for the aquarium trade, but of these the larger, more robust species found in the Colombian Amazon (O. cf. macrospilus) is probably the hardiest and best choice for most aquariums. Safe for all planted tanks and compatible with any peaceful tankmates, the Amazon Oto will feed readily on diatom and other forms of nuisance algae in the aquarium but should be supplemented regularly with sinking veggie-based foods, gel diet, and fresh vegetables like zucchini or romaine lettuce.

Orange Zebra Oto (Hypoptopoma sp. ‘Peru Orange’)

$14.99

A beautifully and distinctively marked relative of the common Otocinclus, the Rio Orange Zebra Oto inhabits Peru’s upper Rio Nanay, where it spends most of its time grazing on submerged driftwood and vegetation. An ideal algae eater for most community or planted aquariums, they will eat filamented algae and diatoms from most surfaces, including the aquarium glass. Like most of their close relatives, they are best kept in groups.

Atromaculatus Cichlid (Mesoheros atromaculatus)

$14.99

An uncommon and smaller growing cichlid from the coastal drainages of Colombia, M. atromaculatus is one of the less aggressive species of its genus (although it is still very much a cichlid). In the aquarium, they are hardy and undemanding and will generally pair off as they grow. Provide ample cover as they will become territorial as adults.

Rio Tigre Zebra Oto (Otocinclus cocama)

$14.99

A beautifully and distinctively marked relative of the common Otocinclus, the Rio Tigre Zebra Oto inhabits Peru’s Rio Tigre, where it spends most of its time grazing on submerged driftwood and vegetation. An ideal algae eater for most community or planted aquariums, they will eat filamened algae and diatoms from most surfaces, including the aquarium glass. Like most of their close relatives, they are best kept in groups.

Common Pike Cichlid (Crenicichla sp. “belly crawler”)

$14.99

One of the smaller species of Pike Cichlids, the so-called “belly crawler” is found in rocky, fast-moving waters throughout Colombia’s Rio Meta drainage. Like most species of Crenicichla, they are territorial and predatory but due to their relatively small adult size can often be kept in mixed species cichlid community tanks. This species is also more easily weaned onto frozen and prepared foods than some of its larger relatives.

Dwarf Chain Loach / Sidthimunki Botia(Ambastia sidthimunki)

$14.99

One of the smallest species of Botia and a longtime favorite in the aquarium hobby, the Dwarf Chain Loach or Sidthimunki Botia is a peaceful, active schooling fish ideally suited to most community or planted tanks. Originally found in river systems along the Thai/Myanmar border, they are now produced commercially for the aquarium trade. Like most Botias and Loaches, they are social fish and should be kept in groups of at least 3 to 5 specimens.

Kubotai / Angelicus Botia (Botia kubotai)

$14.99

One of the more attractive and peaceful species of Loach, the Angelicus or Kubotai Botia originates from the Salween River basin along the Thailand-Myanmar border. Like almost all species of Loach or Botia, they are social fish and best kept in groups of 5 or more. In the aquarium, they are hardy and relatively undemanding, and make for excellent pest snail control in planted tanks.

Out Of Stock

Cobalt Blue Stiphodon Goby (Stiphodon semoni)

$14.99

The most colorful of all freshwater gobies in the genus Stiphodon, the Cobalt Blue Goby originates from fast moving rocky streams in West Papua, Indonesia. In the wild, it lives in small groups where individual fish stake out their own territories among the rocks. They feed on algae growth and biofilms in the wild and in the aquarium should be fed algae or vegetable based sinking foods (gel diets are ideal). They require clean, well-oxygenated water with some current and will do best at slightly cooler temperatures than most tropical fish (74-76F).

“New Ranger” Pleco (Pterygoplichthys sp.)

$14.99

One of the smallest species of pleco known, the “new ranger” is an as-yet undescribed species originating from the Nanay River in Peru. They are an excellent algae eater, feeding on many species of nuisance algae in the aquarium (including diatoms). Although small for a pleco, they are still substantial fish and should be given ample space and cover in the aquarium. Supplement their diet regularly with algae-based sinking foods, gel foods, and fresh vegetables.

Brown Ghost Knifefish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus)

$12.99

Although less well known than the popular Black Ghost Knifefish, the Brown Ghost is a similarly unique species of knifefish found throughout much of the Amazon basin. A hardy species, they feed on insect larvae, crustaceans, and small fish in the wild but in the aquarium usually take to frozen foods very quickly. They are usually found in areas of slow water movement and in warm, acidic water. Although they can be territorial towards each other in the aquarium, it is possible to keep them in small groups as long as ample cover is provided.